Still time to contribute to the Biodiversity Framework

Published on 18 November 2020

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MidCoast Council is currently preparing a Biodiversity Framework, which will help provide a road map to conserve and restore the biodiversity and natural assets across the region.

 The community nominated protection of the natural environment as one of five core values in the inaugural MidCoast Community Strategic Plan in 2016.

“To achieve our community’s vision we’re preparing a Biodiversity Framework which will help us work with the community to manage, conserve and restore ecosystem health and biodiversity in our region,” explained MidCoast Council’s Senior Ecologist, Mat Bell.

“Other government agencies and community members are vital to this effort and we invite you to partner with us for biodiversity conservation.”

The biodiversity of the MidCoast region has important environmental, economic, social and intrinsic value, with well-being, lifestyle and economy connected to the health of the natural environment and the plants and animals within it.

Council is currently asking the wider community to help prepare the Biodiversity Framework by starting a ‘kitchen table conversation’ with family and friends, about biodiversity and completing a survey that’s currently on their Have Your Say Page.

Benefits of biodiversity to the MidCoast region include:

  • Aboriginal connection: For the Biripi and Worimi Aboriginal people, ecologically healthy Country is integral with identity, spiritual and cultural belonging, and in some cases livelihoods.
  • Well-being: Experiencing nature contributes to physical and mental health.
  • Amenity: Access to nature contributes to the liveability of communities.
  • Water supply: Healthy catchments deliver clean water for drinking, farming and other uses.
  • Tourism: Nature-based tourism is a key driver of the MidCoast economy.
  • Primary production: Biodiversity provides ecosystem services such as nutrient-cycling, soil formation, erosion control, water purification and pollination that help support agriculture, fisheries and forestry.
  • Resilience and adaptation: Biodiverse habitats protect shorelines, store floodwaters and sequester carbon to mitigate climate change risks and natural disasters.

There’s still time to find out more and ‘Have Your Say’ on the Biodiversity Framework for the MidCoast region.

Head to www.midcoast.nsw.gov.au/HYS before 4.30pm this Friday 20 November, to read the series of fact sheets and complete the survey.